Breaking ground amid calls to halt

Rompimiento de suelo entre llamados para detener la construcción

  • English
  • Español

Breaking ground amid calls to halt

Story and photos by Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Nancy Morrison and a funeral hearse appeared at the groundbreaking for the new LG Electronics headquarters.

Nancy Morrison and a funeral hearse appeared at the groundbreaking for the new LG Electronics headquarters.

Groundbreaking ceremonies typically do not include funeral hearses.

But the ceremony for LG Electronics North American headquarters in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, featured just that.

“This is the death of the Palisades,” said Don Tripp, a resident of nearby Lambertville. “Today is the funeral, as I see it.”

The black hearse could be seen driving in and out of the parking lot near the site of the ceremony, bearing the banner reading: Protect the Palisades.

Thursday marked the start of construction on LG Electronics’ new $300 million North American headquarters project in Englewood Cliffs, N.J.

Supporters, including elected officials from New Jersey as well as neighbors, local businesses, union leaders and LG employees, gathered at 111 Sylvan Ave. – the future site of LG’s new headquarters – for the official start of demolition, the first step in the construction of the headquarters.

“LG has been a proud corporate citizen of Englewood Cliffs for the past 25 years and we are thrilled to take the first step today to build our new headquarters on a wonderful 27-acre property right here in our hometown,” said Wayne Park, President and CEO of LG Electronics USA. “LG looks forward to bringing all the economic, environmental and educational benefits that this project offers to Englewood Cliffs, to Bergen County and to the State of New Jersey as quickly as possible.”

The building will be the first to break a long-standing ordinance that caps all buildings from Fort Lee, New Jersey to Stony Point, New York, at 35 feet.

Critics of the plan say that the height of the building, which reaches 143 feet, will rise above the tree line, obscuring a view that, to this day, has been an unbroken crest of trees crowning the Palisades. A ten mile stretch of land to the north of Fort Lee, New Jersey was donated by John D. Rockefeller, with a mandate to keep the height of buildings below 35 feet, and the treeline.

“We are thrilled to take the first step today to build our new headquarters on a wonderful 27-acre property right here in our hometown,” said Wayne Park, President and CEO of LG Electronics USA. </br> <i>Photo: LG Electronics USA</i>

“We are thrilled to take the first step today to build our new headquarters on a wonderful 27-acre property right here in our hometown,” said Wayne Park, President and CEO of LG Electronics USA.
Photo: LG Electronics USA

The company got a variance from Englewood Cliffs’ local board of adjustment in 2012. The variance was challenged in court by two local residents who were later joined by numerous environmental groups, but a judge ruled in favor of LG Electronics.

The decision is in the process of being appealed, and a second lawsuit was filed against the community of Englewood Cliffs for granting the zoning variance.

It is still pending.

While LG Electronics is still in court over the height of its proposed new headquarters in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, the company forged ahead with the groundbreaking.

“We’re not concerned about the appeal. If we were concerned about the appeal, we wouldn’t have started the process,” said John Taylor, a spokesman for LG Electronics.

But there is plenty of concern from others.

Four former governors of New Jersey, the Environmental Protection Agency, several newspapers, including the New York Times, the Daily News and the New Jersey Star-Ledger, as well as Protect the Palisades, a coalition of over 30 members, have released statements urging LG Electronics to rethink the design of the headquarters.

While proponents of the plan point to the green design of the headquarters, as well as the jobs and tax revenue that will come, critics say the headquarters, jobs and tax revenue need not be at the loss of the historic viewshed.

Rebecca Biegacz, an Englewood resident, is not convinced the company would not have built on the site without the variance.

“LG would take the land anyway. It’s a great place for them,” she said.

Biegacz also criticized the Board of Adjustment.

“It should be gone. This is not right.”

Larry Rockefeller called the future headquarters the “Hall of Shame.”

Larry Rockefeller called the future headquarters the “Hall of Shame.”

While a number of New Jersey residents came to protest the building, the contingent was well-represented by Northern Manhattanites as well.

Nancy Morrison can see the Palisades from her eighth floor apartment on Riverside Drive. On Thursday, she held up a sign to protest the groundbreaking.

“It’s so remarkable that the Native Americans and traders saw the same view we see today and that Rockefeller had the foresight to preserve this. That LG (Electronics) would step all over this makes me sick,” she said.

Gerri Lehmann is a resident of Cresskill, which is two towns over. She is also a member of the Cresskill Women’s Club, which is affiliated with New Jersey Federation of Women’s Clubs.

Lehmann is quick to point out that it was the Federation that helped prevent further destruction of the Palisades by those wanting to quarry the stone for railroad ballast. The New Jersey Federation of Women’s Clubs is also involved in the effort to get LG Electronics to reconsider its design.

“Why can’t they just make it longer instead of so high? It’s so simple. Everyone else did it,” said Lehmann.

Another vocal opponent of the project is Larry Rockefeller, the grandson of John D. Rockefeller.

Rockefeller called the future headquarters the “Hall of Shame.”

“It’s not only the building itself but the stampede of other tall buildings that this would start up,” he said.

Rockefeller and other critics of the building said the new headquarters would set a precedent.

Over 50 people came out to protest the ground breaking. Rockefeller expects the outrage to mount once construction starts.

Protestors gathered to demonstrate opposition to the building’s size.

Protestors gathered to demonstrate opposition to the building’s size.

“When the cranes go up there’s going to be a lot of shock.”

C.C. Blackburn, a resident of Washington Heights, agreed.

She sees the Palisades from Fort Tryon Park and enjoys hiking the trails on top of the cliffs. She is afraid both experiences will be marred by the size of the building.

“I spend a lot of time walking the Palisades on this side, and looking at the Palisades from the Cloisters and I love it. It takes you back in time,” she said.

Blackburn added that she had nothing against LG Electronics.

“I’m a customer. One would hope that they respect what they have on their own website, which indicates that they believe in environment and sustainability and that they’re a green company, and if they’re a green company, well then hey, take a look at this and people are asking you to respect the treeline.”

Local elected officials also weighed in.

“With our coalition’s legal options not yet exhausted, it is shockingly callous and insensitive for LG to hold this ceremony,” said State Senator Adriano Espaillat in a statement.

It is not just locals who are concerned about the future of the Palisades. The battle for the treeline has garnered international attention.

The World Monuments Fund has listed the Cloisters in Manhattan and the Palisades in New Jersey on its annual list of endangered cultural sites, citing the construction of a new corporate headquarters in Englewood Cliffs that is to rise above the tree line as a threat to the view from the museum across the Hudson.

For 2014, the fund has highlighted 67 sites from 41 countries.

On the list together with the city of Venice, and war-ravaged Syria, are the Palisades and the Cloisters.

For more information about opposition to the headquarters, please visit www.protectthepalisades.org.

To learn more about LG’s plans, please visit LGenglewoodcliffs.com.

 

According to LG…

Wayne Park, President and CEO of LG Electronics USA (left) celebrated the ceremonial planting of the first of 700 new trees that will grow at the future headquarters site.</br> <i>Photo: LG Electronics USA</i>

Wayne Park, President and CEO of LG Electronics USA (left) celebrated the ceremonial planting of the first of 700 new trees that will grow at the future headquarters site.
Photo: LG Electronics USA

LG plans to increase its employment in Englewood Cliffs from 500 today to 1,200 in 2017 and 1,600 by 2020 at the new corporate campus.

In addition to the economic benefits, LG’s new headquarters will be a showcase for

environmentally-friendly design as it seeks to achieve LEED Platinum – the highest LEED

certification for green building. The company plans to transform the existing site by

increasing the green space by more than 50 percent and planting more than 700 new trees – the first of which was planted during Thursday’s construction ceremony.

LG is also investing more than $2 million to create a Science & Environmental Learning Center where local school children will be able to learn about technology and sustainable living.

Rompimiento de suelo entre llamados para detener la construcción

Historia y fotos por Robin Elisabeth Kilmer

Una carroza fúnebre apareció en la colocación de la primera piedra de la nueva sede de LG Electronics.

Una carroza fúnebre apareció en la colocación de la primera piedra de la nueva sede de LG Electronics.

Las ceremonias innovadoras normalmente no incluyen carrozas fúnebres.

Pero la ceremonia de la sede de LG Electronics en Englewood Cliffs, Nueva Jersey, pareció precisamente eso.

“Esta es la muerte de los Palisades”, dijo Don Tripp, un residente de la cercana Lambertville. “Hoy es el funeral, como yo lo veo”.

La carroza fúnebre negra se veía entrar y salir del estacionamiento cerca del sitio de la rotura del suelo, llevando la pancarta que decía: Proteger the Palisades.

Jueves marcó el inicio de la construcción de la nueve sede norteamericana de LG Electronics, un proyecto de 300.000.000 dólares.

Los partidarios, incluyendo a funcionarios electos de Nueva Jersey empleados de LG, así como vecinos, negocios locales, dirigentes sindicales se reunieron en el 111 de la Avenida Sylvan, para el inicio oficial de la demolición, el primer paso en la construcción de la sede.

“LG ha sido un orgulloso ciudadano corporativo de Englewood Cliffs durante los últimos 25 años, y estamos encantados de dar el primer paso hoy para construir nuestra nueva sede en una maravillosa propiedad de 27 acres aquí en nuestra ciudad natal”, dijo Wayne Park, presidente y CEO de LG Electronics EE.UU. “LG espera reunir a todos los beneficios económicos, ambientales y educativos que este proyecto ofrece a Englewood Cliffs, al condado de Bergen y al Estado de New Jersey lo más rápido posible.”

El edificio será el primero en romper una ordenanza de muchos años de que el límite de todos los edificios de Fort Lee, Nueva Jersey, hasta Stony Point, Nueva York, llegue a los 35 pies.

Los críticos del plan dicen que la altura del edificio, que alcanza 143 pies, se elevará por encima de la línea de árboles, ocultando la vista que, hasta la fecha, ha sido una cresta continua de árboles coronando the Palisades. Un tramo de diez millas de largo de las tierras al norte de Fort Lee, Nueva Jersey, fue donado por John D. Rockefeller, con el mandato de mantener la altura de los edificios por debajo de los 35 pies y la línea de árboles.

"Estamos encantados de dar el primer paso hoy para la construcción de nuestra nueva sede en una maravillosa propiedad de 27 acres aquí en nuestro pueblo natal", dijo Wayne Park, presidente y CEO de LG Electronics USA. </br> <i>Foto: LG Electronics USA</i>

“Estamos encantados de dar el primer paso hoy para la construcción de nuestra nueva sede en una maravillosa propiedad de 27 acres aquí en nuestro pueblo natal”, dijo Wayne Park, presidente y CEO de LG Electronics USA.
Foto: LG Electronics USA

La compañía obtuvo una diferencia de ajuste de la junta local de Englewood Cliffs en 2012. La variación fue impugnada en los tribunales por dos residentes locales a quienes más tarde se les sumaron numerosos grupos ecológicos, pero un juez falló a favor de LG Electronics.

La decisión está en proceso de ser apelada y una segunda demanda fue presentada en contra de la comunidad de Englewood Cliffs por conceder la variación de zonificación.

Todavía está pendiente.

Mientras que LG Electronics está todavía en los tribunales por la altura que propone para su nueva sede en Englewood Cliffs, Nueva Jersey, la empresa decidió empezar la construcción de la estructura, no obstante.

“No estamos preocupados por la apelación. Si nos preocupara, no hubiéramos iniciado el proceso”, dijo John Taylor, portavoz de LG Electronics.

Pero los demás tienen muchas preocupaciones.

Cuatro ex gobernadores de Nueva Jersey; la Agencia de Protección Ambiental; varios periódicos, incluyendo el New York Times; The Daily News; The New Jersey Star-Ledger; así como Protect the Palisades, una coalición de más de 30 miembros, han publicado declaraciones exhortando a LG Electronics a reconsiderar el diseño de la sede.

Mientras que los defensores del plan subrayan el diseño verde de la sede, así como los empleos y los ingresos fiscales que generará, los críticos dicen que la sede, los empleos y los ingresos fiscales no necesitan crearse a costa de la histórica vista.

Rebecca Biegacz, residente de Englewood, no está convencida de que la empresa no hubiera podido construir en el sitio sin la variación.

“LG podría tomar la tierra de todos modos. Es un gran lugar para ellos”, dijo.

Biegacz también criticó a la Junta de Ajuste.

“Debería desaparecer. Esto no está bien”.

Larry Rockefeller llamó a la futura sede el "Salón de la vergüenza".

Larry Rockefeller llamó a la futura sede el “Salón de la vergüenza”.

Varios residentes de Nueva Jersey llegaron a protestar por el rompimiento del suelo, y el contingente estuvo bien representado por habitantes del Norte de Manhattan.

Nancy Morrison puede ver the Palisades desde su departamento en el octavo piso en Riverside Drive. El jueves, ella llevaba una pancarta para protestar por la construcción.

“Es muy notable que los estadounidenses y los comerciantes nativos tuvieran la misma vista que vemos hoy y que Rockefeller tuviera el cuidado de preservarla. El que LG (Electronics) pisotee todo eso me da asco”, dijo.

Gerri Lehmann es una residente de Cresskill, que está a dos poblaciones. Ella también es miembro del Club de Mujeres Cresskill, que está afiliada con la Federación de Clubes de Mujeres de Nueva Jersey.

Lehmann se apresura a señalar que fue la Federación la que ayudó a evitar una mayor destrucción de the Palisades por aquellos que querían extraer piedra para el balasto del ferrocarril. La Federación de Clubes de Mujeres de Nueva Jersey también participa en el esfuerzo para lograr que LG Electronics reconsidere su diseño.

“¿Por qué no pueden simplemente hacerlo más largo en lugar de tan alto? Es muy simple. Todo el mundo lo ha hecho”, dijo Lehmann.

Otro opositor del proyecto es Larry Rockefeller, el nieto de John D. Rockefeller.

Rockefeller llamó a la futura sede el “Salón de la Vergüenza”.

“No es sólo el edificio sí mismo, sino la estampida de otros edificios altos que se pondrán en marcha”, dijo.

Rockefeller y otros críticos de la construcción dijeron que la nueva sede sentaría un precedente.

Más de 50 personas salieron a protestar por la ruptura del suelo. Rockefeller espera que la indignación aumente una vez que comience la construcción.

Los manifestantes se reunieron para demostrar su oposición al tamaño del edificio.

Los manifestantes se reunieron para demostrar su oposición al tamaño del edificio.

“Cuando las grúas suban habrá una gran conmoción”.

C.C. Blackburn, residente de Washington Heights, estuvo de acuerdo.

Ella ve the Palisades desde Fort Tryon Park y disfruta de caminatas por los senderos en la parte superior de los acantilados. Tiene miedo de que ambas experiencias se vean empañadas por el tamaño del edificio.

“Paso mucho tiempo caminando por the Palisades de este lado, y mirando the Palisades desde the Cloisters y me encanta. Te lleva al pasado”, dijo.

Blackburn agregó que no tiene nada en contra de LG Electronics.

“Yo soy un cliente. Uno esperaría que respetaran lo que tienen en su propio sitio web que indica que creen en el medio ambiente, la sostenibilidad y que son una empresa ecológica, y si son una empresa ecológica, entonces echen un vistazo a esto, pues la gente está pidiendo que se respete la línea de árboles”.

Funcionarios electos locales también opinaron.

“Con las opciones legales de nuestra coalición aún no agotadas, es terriblemente cruel e insensible de parte de LG el celebrar esta ceremonia”, dijo el senador estatal Adriano Espaillat en un comunicado.

No son sólo los locales quienes están preocupados por el futuro de the Palisades. La batalla por la línea de árboles ha obtenido atención internacional.

El Fondo Mundial de Monumentos ha incluido a Los Cloisters, de Manhattan, y a los Palisades, de Nueva Jersey, en su lista anual de sitios culturales en peligro, citando la construcción de una nueva sede corporativa en Englewood Cliffs que se elevará por encima de la línea de árboles como una amenaza a la vista del museo al otro lado del río Hudson.

Para 2014, el fondo ha destacado 67 sitios en 41 países.

En la lista, junto con la ciudad de Venecia y la devastada por la guerra Siria, están Los Palisades y Los Cloisters.

Para obtener más información acerca de la oposición a la sede, por favor visite www.protectthepalisades.org.

Para conocer más acerca de los planes de LG, por favor visite LGenglewoodcliffs.com.

 

De acuerdo con LG…

Wayne Park, presidente y CEO de LG Electronics USA (a la izquierda) celebra la siembra ceremonial del primero de 700 nuevos árboles que crecerán en el futuro sitio de la sede. </br> <i>Foto: LG Electronics USA</i>

Wayne Park, presidente y CEO de LG Electronics USA (a la izquierda) celebra la siembra ceremonial del primero de 700 nuevos árboles que crecerán en el futuro sitio de la sede.
Foto: LG Electronics USA

LG tiene previsto aumentar su número de empleos en Englewood Cliffs de 500 hoy en día a 1,200 en 2017 y a 1,600 en 2020 en el nuevo campus corporativo.

Además de los beneficios económicos, la nueva sede de LG será un escaparate para el diseño respetuoso del medio ambiente, ya que pretende conseguir la LEED Platinum, la más alta certificación LEED para la edificación sustentable. La compañía planea transformar el sitio existente aumentando el espacio verde en más de un 50 por ciento y plantando más de 700 árboles nuevos, el primero de los cuales se sembró durante la ceremonia de construcción del jueves.

LG también está invirtiendo más de $2 millones de dólares para crear un centro de aprendizaje científico y medioambiental donde los niños de las escuelas locales puedan aprender acerca de la tecnología y la vida sustentable.